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Choosing the Purrfect Cat Carrier

September 15, 2020

Does your cat enjoy riding in the car? The answer to that question is probably no. Most of our feline friends absolutely despise car rides! Sooner or later, though, your pet will need to be transported. When she is, she should always be contained in a carrier. So, what should you look for when picking a cat carrier? Here’s your guide: 


Size

Bigger is usually better when it comes to animal housing or cages, but that isn’t the case here. You don’t want to choose a carrier that’s too big—cats can tumble around in large carriers, and they tend to feel safest in small spaces. Keep in mind, though, that if the carrier is too small, your cat could feel trapped.

As a rule of thumb, the carrier should be about one and a half times the size of your cat. Fluffy should be able to sit up, turn around, and sleep in various positions, and there should also be space for her food and water dishes.


Material

Hard and soft carriers alike have their pros and cons. Nylon carriers are lightweight, attractive, and easy to store. But they tend to sag and may not protect Fluffy from being jostled around. They also don’t provide significant protection in case of an accident or a sharp stop. Plastic carriers may not be as pretty, but they are durable and easy to clean. You might find that a carrier that opens from the top is a little easier to manage.


Cardboard

You can also find cardboard box carriers.Consider them one-time use carriers. Shelters often provide these for new adoptees to bring cats home in. They’ll also work in a pinch. But the downsides are that they don’t last long, they fall apart if they get wet, and they’re easy for your cat to get out of.


Tips

Helping your feline friend form a positive impression of her carrier will definitely make things easier. Add some comfy bedding and some toys to the carrier; give your cat toys, praise, and even catnip while she’s in it. And try leaving the carrier out between transports. If your cat only sees the carrier before she goes to the vet, she’ll only associate it with bad things. 


Please contact your local animal hospital for all your cat’s veterinary care needs. We’re always here to help!

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